Rast et al., 2014. The identification of regions of significance in the effect of multimorbidity on depressive symptoms using longitudinal data: an application of the Johnson-Neyman technique.

Rast, P., Rush, J., Piccinin, A., & Hofer, S. M. (2014). The identification of regions of significance in the effect of multimorbidity on depressive symptoms using longitudinal data: An application of the Johnson-Neyman technique. Gerontology60(3), 274-281.

Year: 
2014
Status: 
complete
Abstract: 

Background: The investigation of multimorbidity and aging is complex and highly intertwined with aging-related changes in physical and cognitive capabilities, and mental health and is known to affect psychological distress and quality of life. Under these circumstances it is important to understand how the effects of chronic conditions evolve over time relative to aging-related and end-of-life changes. The identification of periods in time where multimorbidity impacts particular outcomes such as depressive symptoms, versus periods of time where this is not the case, reduces the complexity of the phenomenon. 

Objective: We present the Johnson-Neyman (JN) technique in the context of a curvilinear longitudinal model with higher-order terms to probe moderatorst and to identify regions of statistical significance. In essence, the JN technique allows one to identify conditions under which moderators impact an outcome from conditions where these effects are not significant. 

Methods: To illustrate the use of the JN technique in a longitudinal sample, we used data from the Health and Retirement Study. Analyses were based on time-to-death models including participants who died within the study duration of 12 years. 

Results: Multimorbidity differentially affects rates of change in depression. For some periods in time the effects are statistically significant while in other periods the same effects are not statistically different from zero. 

Conclusion: The JN technique is useful to continuously probe moderating effects and to identify particular interactions with the model for time when certain effects are or are not statistically significant. In the context of multimorbidity this method is particularly useful for interpreting the complex interactions with differential change over time.

Yoneda et al., 2018. Increases in Neuroticism May Be an Early Indicator of Dementia

Yoneda, T., Rush, J., Graham, E. K., Berg, A. I., Comijs, H., Katz, M., Lipton, R., Johansson, B., Mroczek, D., & Piccinin, A. (2018). Increases in Neuroticism May Be an Early Indicator of Dementia: A Coordinated Analysis. The Journal of Gerontology Series B: Psychological Sciences and Social Science; doi: 10.1093/geronb/gby034

Year: 
2018
Status: 
complete
Presentation Citations: 

Yoneda, T. & Piccinin, A. Increases in neuroticism in individuals with incident diagnosis of dementia and MCI: Implications of heterogeneity between datasets (2018). Symposium presentation at the European Conference of Personality, in Zadar, Croatia.

Yoneda, T., Graham, E. K., Lewis, N., Johansson, B., & Piccinin, A. Covariation between Change in Neuroticism and Change in Cognitive Functioning (Nov, 2018). Symposium Presentation to be presented at the Gerontological Society of America Conference, Boston, MA

Abstract: 

Objectives: Although personality change is typically considered a symptom of dementia, some studies suggest that personality change may be an early indication of dementia. One prospective study found increases in neuroticism preceding dementia diagnosis. This study extends this research by examining trajectories of personality traits in additional longitudinal studies of aging.

Methods: Three independent series of latent growth curve models were fitted to data from the Longitudinal Aging Study Amsterdam and Einstein Aging Study to estimate trajectories of personality traits in individuals with incident dementia diagnosis (total N = 210), in individuals with incident Mild Cognitive Impairment (N = 135), and in individuals who did not receive a diagnosis during follow-up periods (total N = 1740).

Results: Controlling for sex, age, education, depressive symptoms, and the interaction between age and education, growth curve analyses consistently revealed significant linear increases in neuroticism preceding dementia diagnosis in both datasets and in individuals with mild cognitive impairment. Analyses examining individuals without a diagnosis revealed nonsignificant change in neuroticism overtime.

Discussion: Replication of our previous work in 2 additional datasets provides compelling evidence that increases in neuroticism may be early indication of dementia, which can facilitate development of screening assessments.

Yoneda et al., 2018. Trajectories of Personality Traits Preceding Dementia Diagnosis

Yoneda, T., Rush, J., Berg, A. I., Johansson, B. & Piccinin, A. (2017). Trajectories of Personality Traits Preceding Dementia Diagnosis. The Journal of Gerontology Series B: Psychological Sciences and Social Sciences, 72(6), 922-931, DOI: 10.1093/geronb/gbw006

Year: 
2017
Status: 
complete
Presentation Citations: 

Yoneda, T. & Piccinin, A. A coordinated analysis examining personality change in older adults: Consistent results despite heterogeneity between datasets (November, 2018). Symposium Presentation to be presented at the Gerontological Society of America Conference, Boston, MA.

Yoneda, T., Rush, J., Knight, J., Graham, E. K., Mroczek, D., Berg, A. I., Johansson, B., Pedersen, N., Comijs, H., Katz, M., Lipton, R. & Piccinin, A. (2017). Investigation of Personality Using Different Time Matrices, Control Variables and Inclusion Groups. Poster Presentation at IAGG conference in San Francisco. 

Yoneda, T., Rush, J., Graham, E. K., Mroczek, D., Berg, A. I., Johansson, B., Pedersen, N., Comijs, H., Katz, M., Lipton, R. & Piccinin, A. (November, 2016). Trajectories of Personality Traits Preceding Dementia Diagnosis: A Coordinated Analysis. Symposium Presentation at the Gerontological Society of America Conference, New Orleans, LA.  

Yoneda, T. (2016). Trajectories of Personality Traits Preceding Dementia Diagnosis: A Coordinated Analysis. Unpublished Master’s Thesis, University of Victoria, Victoria, BC. 

Yoneda, T., Rush, J., Berg, A. I., Johansson, B., Comijs, H. & Piccinin, A. (November, 2015). Trajectories of Personality Traits Preceding Dementia Diagnosis: A Coordinated Analysis. Poster Presentation at the Gerontological Society of America Conference, Washington, D.C.
 

Yoneda, T., Piccinin, A. & Johansson, B. (April, 2015). Association between cognition and personality change in the oldest-old. Presentation at University of Victoria Social Dimensions of Health 2015 Conference, Victoria, BC.

Yoneda, T., Koval, A., Johansson, B. & Piccinin, A. (November, 2014). Personality change preceding diagnosis of dementia in the oldest-old. Poster Presentation at the Gerontological Society of America Conference, Washington, D.C.

Abstract: 

Introduction: Although personality change is typically considered a symptom of dementia, some studies suggest that personality change may be an early indication of dementia. This project examines this possibility by examining trajectories of personality traits preceding dementia diagnosis in several longitudinal studies of aging.

Methods: Three independent series of latent growth curve models were fitted to data from the Origins of Variance in the Oldest-Old (OCTO-Twin), Longitudinal Aging Study Amsterdam (LASA) and Einstein Aging Study (EAS) to estimate trajectories of personality traits in individuals with incident dementia diagnosis (Total N = 295), in individuals with incident Mild Cognitive Impairment (N = 135), and in individuals who did not receive a diagnosis during follow-up periods (Total N = 2109).

Results: Controlling for sex, age, education, depressive symptoms, and the interaction between age and education, growth curve analyses consistently revealed significant linear increases in neuroticism preceding dementia diagnosis in both datasets and in individuals with MCI. Analyses examining individuals without a diagnosis revealed non-significant change in neuroticism overtime.

Discussion: Replication in several datasets provides compelling evidence that increases in neuroticism may be early indication of dementia, which can facilitate development of screening assessments and aid in early care strategies.

Robitaille, 2014. Physical Activity And Cognitive Functioning in the Oldest Old

Robitaille, A., Muniz, G., Lindwall, M., Piccinin, A. M., Hoffman, L., Johansson, B., & Hofer, S. M. (2014). Physical activity and cognitive functioning in the oldest old: within-and between-person cognitive activity and psychosocial mediators. European Journal of Ageing, 11(4), 333-347.

Year: 
2012
Status: 
complete
Presentation Citations: 

Robitaille, A., Muniz, G., Lindwall, M., Piccinin, A.M., Hoffman, L., Johansson, B., & Hofer, S.M. (October, 2012). Physical activity and cognitive functioning among older adults: Within- and between-person cognitive and psychosocial mediators.  Poster session presented at the 41th Annual Scientific and Educational Meeting of the CAG, Vancouver, BC.

Abstract: 

The current study examines the role of social contact intensity, cognitive activity, and depressive symptoms as within- and between-person mediators for the relationships between physical activity and cognitive functioning. All three types of mediators were considered simultaneously using multilevel structural equations modeling with longitudinal data. The sample consisted of 470 adults ranging from 79.37 to 97.92 years of age (M = 83.4; SD = 3.2) at the first occasion. Between-person differences in cognitive activity mediated the relationship between physical activity and cognitive functioning, such that individuals who participated in more physical activities, on average, engaged in more cognitive activities and, in turn, showed better cognitive functioning. Mediation of between-person associations between physical activity and memory through social contact intensity was also significant. At the within-person level, only cognitive activity mediated the relationship between physical activity and change in cognition; however, the indirect effect was small. Depressive symptomatology was not found to significantly mediate within- or between-person effects on cognitive change. Our findings highlight the implications of physical activity participation for the prevention of cognitive decline and the importance of meditational processes at the between-person level. Physical activity can provide older adults with an avenue to make new friendships and engage in more cognitive activities which, in turn, attenuates cognitive decline.