Robitaille, 2014. Physical Activity And Cognitive Functioning in the Oldest Old

Robitaille, A., Muniz, G., Lindwall, M., Piccinin, A. M., Hoffman, L., Johansson, B., & Hofer, S. M. (2014). Physical activity and cognitive functioning in the oldest old: within-and between-person cognitive activity and psychosocial mediators. European Journal of Ageing, 11(4), 333-347.

Year: 
2012
Status: 
complete
Presentation Citations: 

Robitaille, A., Muniz, G., Lindwall, M., Piccinin, A.M., Hoffman, L., Johansson, B., & Hofer, S.M. (October, 2012). Physical activity and cognitive functioning among older adults: Within- and between-person cognitive and psychosocial mediators.  Poster session presented at the 41th Annual Scientific and Educational Meeting of the CAG, Vancouver, BC.

Abstract: 

The current study examines the role of social contact intensity, cognitive activity, and depressive symptoms as within- and between-person mediators for the relationships between physical activity and cognitive functioning. All three types of mediators were considered simultaneously using multilevel structural equations modeling with longitudinal data. The sample consisted of 470 adults ranging from 79.37 to 97.92 years of age (M = 83.4; SD = 3.2) at the first occasion. Between-person differences in cognitive activity mediated the relationship between physical activity and cognitive functioning, such that individuals who participated in more physical activities, on average, engaged in more cognitive activities and, in turn, showed better cognitive functioning. Mediation of between-person associations between physical activity and memory through social contact intensity was also significant. At the within-person level, only cognitive activity mediated the relationship between physical activity and change in cognition; however, the indirect effect was small. Depressive symptomatology was not found to significantly mediate within- or between-person effects on cognitive change. Our findings highlight the implications of physical activity participation for the prevention of cognitive decline and the importance of meditational processes at the between-person level. Physical activity can provide older adults with an avenue to make new friendships and engage in more cognitive activities which, in turn, attenuates cognitive decline.

 

Brown et al., 2012. Social Activity and Cognitive Functioning Over Time: A Coordinated Analysis of Four Longitudinal Studies

Brown, C.L., Gibbons, L.E., Kennison, R.F., Robitaille, A., Lindwall, M., Mitchell, M., Shirk, S.D., Atri, A., Cimino, C.R., Benitez, A., MacDonald, S.W.S., Zelinski, E., Willis, S.L., Schaie, K.W., Johansson, B., Dixon, R.A., Mungas, D.M., Hofer, S.M. & Piccinin, A.M.  (2012). Social activity and cognitive functioning over time: a coordinated analysis of four longitudinal studies. Journal of Aging Research, vol. 2012, Article ID 287438, 12 pages. doi:10.1155/2012/287438.

Year: 
2012
Status: 
complete
Presentation Citations: 

Brown, C.L., Piccinin, A.M.,  Gibbons, L.E., Robitaille, A., Kennison, R.F., Lindwall, M., Mitchell, M., Shirk, S.D., Atri, A., Benitez, A., MacDonald, S.W.S., Zelinski, E., Willis, S.L., Schaie, K.W., Johansson, B., Dixon, R.A., Mungas, D.M., Cimino, C.R., & Hofer, S.M. (October, 2012). Social activity and maintaining cognitive abilities in aging: Evidence from up to 21 years of longitudinal data from three nations. Poster presented at the 41th Annual Scientific and Educational Meeting of the Canadian Association on Gerontology, Vancouver, BC. 

Abstract: 

Social activity is typically viewed as part of an engaged lifestyle that may help mitigate the deleterious effects of advanced age on cognitive function. As such, social activity has been examined in relation to cognitive abilities later in life. However, longitudinal evidence for this hypothesis thus far remains inconclusive. The current study sought to clarify the relationship between social activity and cognitive function over time using a coordinated data analysis approach across four longitudinal studies. A series of multilevel growth models with social activity included as a covariate is presented. Four domains of cognitive function were assessed: reasoning, memory, fluency, and semantic knowledge. Results suggest that baseline social activity is related to some, but not all, cognitive functions. Baseline social activity levels failed to predict rate of decline in most cognitive abilities. Changes in social activity were not consistently associated with cognitive functioning. Our findings do not provide consistent evidence that changes in social activity correspond to immediate benefits in cognitive functioning, except perhaps for verbal fluency.